Juvenile Detention: The Epidemic Among Black and Latino Youth

Young black and Latino children in impoverished communities are victims of what is called the school-to-prison pipeline, in which policies such as zero tolerance and the use of police in schools has turned from a desire to help into a punishment, one resulting in a student’s suspension or expulsion. The expelled student’s lack of education and guidance leads them to commit crimes.

A PBS article titled “Fact Sheet: How Bad Is the School-to-Prison Pipeline?”, Carla Amurao discussed how school policies disproportionately target minority students.

“Students who are forced out of school for disruptive behavior are usually sent back to the origin of their angst and unhappiness – their home environments or their neighborhoods, which are filled with negative influence,” Amurao wrote.

Black and Latino students are far more likely to be pushed out of school than whites. According to pbs.org, 40 percent of students expelled from school each year are black, and 70 percent of students arrested in school or referred to police are black and Latino.

The following map examines neighborhoods from each of New York City’s boroughs that send more juvenile offenders to detention than any other.

 

 

 

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